Spain’s National Institute of Agricultural and Food Research (INIA) will host a forum on the pre­ven­tion of Xylella fas­tidiosa, specif­i­cally focussing on the impact of cli­mate change on the spread of the pathogen.

Researchers from var­i­ous fields, olive oil pro­fes­sion­als and offi­cials from Spain’s Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food will gather on December 12 in Madrid to dis­cuss the lat­est sci­en­tific stud­ies on Xylella as well as cur­rent efforts to con­tain and erad­i­cate the deadly plant pathogen.

“With the dis­sem­i­na­tion of the lat­est sci­en­tific results and the debate among the agents involved, INIA intends to facil­i­tate sci­en­tific coop­er­a­tion and dis­sem­i­na­tion of knowl­edge on this pathogen, hop­ing that it con­tributes to the search for solu­tions that min­i­mize their impact on the affected areas and limit their dis­per­sion and path­o­genic­ity in our ter­ri­tory, con­sid­er­ing the cur­rent cli­mate change con­text,” INIA said in a state­ment.

Xylella fas­tidiosa was first detected in Spain in November 2016 on the island of Mallorca. Since then, cases of Xylella have been con­firmed in the rest of the Balearic Islands as well as in the provinces of Alicante, Madrid and Almería.

While no olive trees have yet been infected (the major­ity of infected trees are almond trees) the pathogen is highly con­ta­gious and the after­math can be finan­cially dev­as­tat­ing for farm­ers.



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